Rustic Pizza Sauce

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Italy? Greece? Egypt? Just who invented Pizza?! That answer varies depending on who you ask. Pizza is a flatbread after all, and all of the possible birthplaces certainly deserve homage for their respective flatbread creations. Regardless of who topped their flatbread first, the pizza we know today originated in Naples, Italy as an inexpensive flatbread to feed the poor.

Although the jury may still be out on origination, the verdict is in on initial toppings. Fruit toppings eventually gave way to a savory pizza topped with herbs and cheese. The Neapolitans also get to take credit for adding tomatoes to pizza in the 1500s. Upon their arrival to Europe from the Americas, tomatoes were considered vile throughout much of Italy. It was the needy of Naples who used tomatoes on their flatbread, thereby creating the primitive pizza sauce.

Brought to the United States by Italian immigrants, pizza remained unfamiliar to Americans for years. The Unites States pizza boom coincided with WWII troops returning home from Italy with a hankering for pizza. For the past three decades, we have been marking the month of October with a red “P” and calling it National Pizza Month. With over $40 Billion in annual sales, it is safe to say pizza is glorified year-round in America.

If you come to stay with us for the weekend, you will more than likely be subjected to pizza at least once. Thinking about our weekend guests over the past year, only one occasion was void of such a feast. Whether charred over the open fire, singed by the flames of the grill, or sizzling in the oven, a pizza party is bound to happen. Come Saturday evening, chances are we’ll head outside where you will be greeted with a variety of crusts, cheeses ranging from fresh Mozzarella to Roquefort, and bowls filled with tempting toppings. Or, perhaps you will see a menu like this.
Pizza Party!
We give you an ingredient list and a tray of toppings, and off you go to make your pizza to share with others. It’s fun, it gets your company involved, and it allows us to have more time to spend with family and friends.

White and pesto based pizzas make an appearance from time to time, especially when potatoes are a topping, but red sauce is usually our preference. After multiple attempts to find a pizza sauce that wasn’t sickly sweet, we gave up and made our own. We’re glad we did, and we think you will be too. Requiring only ten minutes of cook time and a handful of ingredients, the most involved part of the recipe is draining the tomatoes.

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Rustic Pizza Sauce
Clean, rustic, and simple ingredients. Perfect for topping pizzas, tossing with fresh pasta, or used as a dunking sauce for crusty garlic bread.
Cuisine Italian
Prep Time 5 Minutes
Cook Time 15 Minutes
Passive Time 25 Minutes
Servings
12- inch pizzas
Ingredients
Cuisine Italian
Prep Time 5 Minutes
Cook Time 15 Minutes
Passive Time 25 Minutes
Servings
12- inch pizzas
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Over a sink, pierce each tomato with your fingers to drain all the juice and remove the seeds from each cavity.Leaving a few seeds is fine. As you work, transfer drained and deseeded tomatoes to a food processor. In 1 second intervals, pulse tomatoes 12 times. Transfer pulsed tomatoes to a fine mesh sieve or colander. Drain for 30 minutes, stirring and pressing firmly with hands every 5 minutes to eliminate juice.
  2. In a medium pan, heat oil over medium-low heat. Cook garlic for 2 minutes, add red pepper flake and tomato paste, and cook for 3 additional minutes. Reduce heat to low. Add drained tomatoes, tomato sauce, oregano, salt and pepper, and stir to combine. Cook 10 minutes over low heat.
Recipe Notes

*To make multiple batches, increase cooking time 10 minutes per batch.
*Store leftover sauce in the freezer for later use.

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3 thoughts on “Rustic Pizza Sauce”

  1. Can’t wait to try the pizza sauce! Was wondering if you could use fresh tomatoes and if so how would I prepare them?

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